Trekking to Historic Theatres

President Abraham Lincoln, presidential box in Ford's Theatre
President Abraham Lincoln, presidential box in Ford’s Theatre
April 15th is probably more-well known as being the deadline to pay one’s Federal and State Taxes foreshadowing a date that has gone down in history. The headlines magnified April 14th as the day the President of the United States, Abraham Lincoln, was shot and mortally wounded, although Lincoln did not die until the morning of April 15, 1865.

This horrific event occurred in Ford’s Theatre, at the hands of John Wilkes Booth, a famous actor turned assassin. There had been a number of stories associated with the assassination of the President, including (years later) that Ford’s Theater was cursed since more than one tragedy occurred there.

Ford's Theatre in 1870 and in 2011
Ford’s Theatre in 1870 and in 2011

Unless you are a history buff you may not have known Ford’s theatre was originally built in 1833 as a House of Worship until 1861, when the First Baptist Church of Washington, DC moved to a newly built structure. John T. Ford bought the church, renovated it for a theatre, only to be destroyed by fire one year later. Not to be discouraged, Ford rebuilt the structure and opened the magnificent “thespian temple” in August 1863. Its theatre fame, however, was short lived. Following Lincoln’s assassination an order was given that Ford’s Theatre was prohibited from being used as a public place for entertainment, thus the building was used for other purposes for a number of years.
Continue reading “Trekking to Historic Theatres”

Advertisements

FREE is GOOD! Part 3 of a 3 part series

Macy's 4th of July Parade flickr image by Joyce Andes
Macy’s 4th of July Parade
flickr image by Joyce Andes

Why not Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, the birthplace of our country? You might head over to Great Plaza at Penn’s Landing for the Philadelphia Orchestra Neighborhood Concert or simply watch the fireworks at the Philly 4th of July Jam.

If Philly is not on your mind, perhaps the beauty of the Smoky Mountains is calling your name – so head over to UNC’s Kenan Memorial Stadium in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, to hear live music by Kenny Mann and Liquid Pleasure, and a spectacular light up the sky fireworks display. You don’t want to miss the watermelon eating contest as well . . .
Continue reading “FREE is GOOD! Part 3 of a 3 part series”

We Remember . . .

Tomb of the Unknown Soldier - Arlington National Cemetery Wikimedia Commons Image Tomb of the Unknown Soldier – Arlington National Cemetery
Wikimedia Commons Image

Memorial Day is seen differently by many.  There are those who see it as a 3-day holiday, time to gather with friends and family for a backyard BBQ or a picnic in the park.  Others look at it as the start of summer vacation.  Depending on the area you live you might appreciate the warmth it brings; a real end to late spring winter-like weather.  Often young people see it as the official ending of the school year with visions of sleeping late or playing the day away. Late May is also a gardeners’ delight.  No matter how you view Memorial Day, there is one constant for the last Monday in May It is a Day of Remembrance. Continue reading “We Remember . . .”

Reflecting on January . . .

Except for those of us who might be called snow bunnies, most folks don’t care for the month of January, which normally is a cold and dreary month.  January, however, yields many reasons for travel, and certainly reflecting on the past  . . . such as . . . .

The first presidential election was held in January 1789; subsequently four U.S. presidents were born in the month of January,  and four U.S. presidents died in the month of January; among them President Theodore Roosevelt.
Continue reading “Reflecting on January . . .”