Food For Thought

Every trip should include a glimpse into the cuisine that is part of the area visited.  Thus, this post will feature a few recipes and referral’s to some great websites for those foodies out there that might want to whet their appetite with something new from a culture other than their own.

Are you a vegetarian or a Vegan? 

This website, www.ivcooking.com/ features recipes from the cookbook Indian Vegetarian

Below are a few terms you might want to become familiar with as you consider preparing something healthful for the soul:

  • Batata Wada – Who doesn’t like potato dumplings
    http://www.indianfoodforever.com/snacks/samosa.html

  • Samosa – Fried, potato-filled dough pockets – sounds yummy to me
  • Spinach Raita – It has yogurt – now that’s healthy       

  • Tandoor or Tandori – meaning clay oven or cooking in the clay ‘Tandoor’ oven (respectively
  • Chutney’s can be sweet, savory and/or spicy.  They are served as an accompaniment to many Indian meals.  Yogurt and peanuts are often used in Chutneys.
  • Anarasay – a flaky eggless-sugar cookie with coconut
  • Noodle Payasam – Delicately seasoned pudding with rice noodle Vermicelli 

 

A traditional French lunch or dinner includes:

L’entrée – (a starter – or type of appetizer) – this can be cold or hot, soup. Small salads or vegetable and hors d’oeuvre to name a few

Le plat principal – (the main course) – which can consist of meat, or fish and one or two vegetables

Le fromage – (Cheese) – usually a platter of cheese is set out with two, three or more varieties of cheeses www.countryliving.com/cooking/recipes/delectble-holiday-appetizers-1208 to learn about cheese platters (P3)

Le dessert – a dessert is always served, and contrary to popular belief they are not always rich and decadent.  They are relatively light, like a tart with fruits

Le coffee – Normally a strong expresso is served following dessert which prepares one for Cognac (a high quality grape brandy distilled in Cognac, France) or Armagnac (a dry brandy distilled in Armagnac district in France).

Le Vin (wine) is usually served during the meal.

 

Mormon Cusine is by far easier to identify when left to the experts or to other blog sites such as:

There you have it;  food for the spirit and food for the soul.

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